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Paul Heller

Paul is a baritone trained in Bel Canto, he began singing at an early age, taking part of the service whenever the Cantor decided he should, leading youth services, he also was a soloist in several choirs at age 14. Cantor Joachim Preuss, originally from Danzig - Rabbi Dr. Meir Gurevich and Chief Rabbi Alfredo Goldschmidt were his mentors.

Having trained as a Dentist and obtaining a doctoral degree from the Pontifical Xavierian University, he combined dental work and taking over the position Cantor Preuss left after passing while also contributing as a certified translator to his father's translations office, acting as a simultaneous interpreter in dental and medical congresses.

Paul studied two years full-time at Yeshivot in Jerusalem, Talmud, Jewish Law and Philosophy together with voice lessons at the Rubin Academy and private coaching, which convinced him a life in prayer was his primary vocation. Since 1996, he has been dedicated solely to the Cantorate, and has occupied positions serving Synagogues in Colombia, Ecuador, the Great Synagogue of Stockholm and now London.

As an internationally acclaimed Cantor, Paul has sung at various events in the presence of Royalty, Nobel Prize winners, Presidents, Prime Ministers and other dignitaries, and twice at Westminster Abbey, as well as having sung live on TV and radio programs.

He has been a member of the Cantors Assembly since 1998, and the European Cantors Association since 2013. He considers himself a guardian of the Western European tradition, sings music by composers Salomon Sulzer, Samuel Naumbourg and Louis Lewandowski among others. He also has an immense affection for Ladino - a language close to the seven he speaks.

Paul is happily married to Antge Nisimblat a Culturologist, Art Historian and Museum Educator and Certified Stockholm's Guide. They are the proud parents of Yohel and Michelle - both  University students.

Paul is currently the Cantor at Belsize Square Synagogue in London which has a strong and prestigious musical tradition.